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CCC&TI helps students discover their artistic talents
Hidden abilities revealed during classes lead to new careers, art sales and shows.
Posted: Sunday, Sep. 13, 2009

I’ve always had a great respect for teachers, no matter what grade they teach or where their specialty lies.  Teachers have a special job: they prepare us for the real world.  In times like these, the skills and inspiration that teachers offer is more valuable than ever…..

CCC&TI helps students discover their artistic talents

Hidden abilities revealed during classes lead to new careers, art sales and shows.

Posted: Sunday, Sep. 13, 2009

Two students at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute are finding success with their artistic talent.

betty0913.ART_GKKP1M3L.1+arnold sculpture.JPG.embedded.prod_affiliate.138Michael Arnold discovered a hidden talent and a new career when the demolition company he worked for went out of business. He enrolled at CCC&TI to pursue a GED and signed up for a welding class as well.

“We spent several weeks welding straight lines, and I wanted to try something different,” he said. “So I started welding scrap pieces together just to see what I could make out of them.”

The Granite Falls native created metal sculptures of a horse, a praying mantis, a stork, a reading man, a tree and a 90-pound dragon fly in just a few months. He has sold several pieces and won CCC&TI’s Spring Fling Recycled Art Contest with a mask he created out of scrap metal.

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By JIM COOK
Published: September 15, 2009
A new state grant will help Wallace Community College continue to train workers in welding, a career field that appears to be almost recession proof, according to school officials.
State Sen. Harri Anne Smith, R-Slocomb, presented a check for $90,000 to the college on Tuesday. The money will be used to purchase more equipment for the program, which has rapidly grown in enrollment since the onset of the recession. Smith secured the grant from a workforce development program.
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, welding, soldering and brazing jobs employed 462,000 people in 2006, with the vast majority of those jobs being in manufacturing. Demand for employees is expected to grow about 5 percent nationally through 2016.
According to state studies, the welding workforce will increase 2.13 percent annually through the next decade, largely due to the influx of automobile manufacturing plants in Alabama. Sally Buchanan, a Wallace spokesperson, said local demand is expected to increase at 2.71 percent, slightly above the state average. Some area employers requiring these skills include Michelin, NYPRO, Perdue, Sara Lee Bakery plants, Southeastern Sheet Metal, Farley
Nuclear Plant, Covenant Steel, and Outdoor Aluminum.
This increased demand for welders hits at a time when the average age of welders is 54, said Dewey Lee, a Wallace welding instructor. Lee said students who complete the certified pipe welding program at Wallace can expect to find entry-level work at $15 to $25 per hour.

Welding grant helps Wallace College expand training

By JIM COOK
Published: September 15, 2009

A new state grant will help Wallace Community College continue to train workers in welding, a career field that appears to be almost recession proof, according to school officials.

State Sen. Harri Anne Smith, R-Slocomb, presented a check for $90,000 to the college on Tuesday. The money will be used to purchase more equipment for the program, which has rapidly grown in enrollment since the onset of the recession. Smith secured the grant from a workforce development program.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, welding, soldering and brazing jobs employed 462,000 people in 2006, with the vast majority of those jobs being in manufacturing. Demand for employees is expected to grow about 5 percent nationally through 2016.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE ->

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