Welded Clamps Deter Thefts

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How much do you value your car’s catalytic converter?  I don’t know about you, but I kind of like mine, and I’d kind of like it to stay where it is: attached to my car!  Thankfully, a device exists called a CatClamp™ (made by American Welding Inc.) to thwart off any would be “CatCons.”  

Stainless Steel Clamp Thwarts CatCon Thieves
May 1, 2009 12:00 PM
When welding isn’t the answer, fabricator finds the right method to get an idea to market.
Thieves are shameless in their pursuit catalytic converters (they’re after the precious metal contents, especially platinum), which has resulted in the development of a number of defensive devices aimed at preventing efforts to cut the “cats” away from a vehicle’s exhaust system.
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The emissions control devices use platinum and palladium as oxidizing catalysts to remove several pollutants from a gasoline engine’s exhaust stream. Platinum, the more expensive metal, sold for $600/ounce five years ago. In 2008 the price was over $2,000/ounce — far more valuable than gold.
The crime is simple, and too common: a thief slips under a vehicle, often a SUV or truck with ample clearance and, with a reciprocating saw, slices through the exhaust pipe on either end of the catalytic converter, freeing it for removal. The operation takes about 10 seconds, and may yield the criminal $50 to $250, or more, from a scrap yard or recycler.
One of the most affordable and foolproof designs to combat catcon theft is a stainless steel device known as the CatClamp™ (www.catclamp.com), an innovation manufactured by American Welding Inc. (www.americanweldinginc.com) — a welding and fabricating operation in Toledo, OH.

Stainless Steel Clamp Thwarts CatCon Thieves

May 1, 2009 12:00 PM

When welding isn’t the answer, fabricator finds the right method to get an idea to market.

Thieves are shameless in their pursuit catalytic converters (they’re after the precious metal contents, especially platinum), which has resulted in the development of a number of defensive devices aimed at preventing efforts to cut the “cats” away from a vehicle’s exhaust system.

The emissions control devices use platinum and palladium as oxidizing catalysts to remove several pollutants from a gasoline engine’s exhaust stream. Platinum, the more expensive metal, sold for $600/ounce five years ago. In 2008 the price was over $2,000/ounce — far more valuable than gold.

The crime is simple, and too common: a thief slips under a vehicle, often a SUV or truck with ample clearance and, with a reciprocating saw, slices through the exhaust pipe on either end of the catalytic converter, freeing it for removal. The operation takes about 10 seconds, and may yield the criminal $50 to $250, or more, from a scrap yard or recycler.

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