4 Things to Consider When Choosing Welding Equipment


Selecting the proper equipment for your welding application can be an intimidating task for a first-time buyer. Thankfully, an expert is here to help with the process. Charlie Minnick, a welding instructor for Miller Electric Mfg. Co. shares some important considerations including available power, material type, intensity of machine use, and the thickness of the material you intend to weld. Not to mention, the welding accessory experts here at Arc Zone can also answer all your welding questions.

Miller Electric Gives Advice On Choosing Welding Equipment:
Common sense advice from Miller on equipment picks.

Published in the April 2003 issue.

Having the ability to weld greatly expands your ability to repair and to build, but it can be daunting for the first-time buyer to select equipment. With that in mind, here are some words of advice from Charlie Minnick, a welding instructor for Miller Electric Mfg. Co., a manufacturer of welders based in Appleton, Wis.

Where To Start
First, your equipment choice is based on several factors. Listed in random order they are:

1. The power you have available.
Most home shops will have 120- or 240-volt single phase power. This is the typical power available for hobbyists who are setting up shop in their garage or an outbuilding. This also holds true for most light-commercial buildings. Higher-voltage machines enable you to weld heavier metals more quickly as well as run other kinds of large shop machinery–such as sandblasters and large saws.

2. Material type.
What will you be welding most of the time–sheet steel, stainless steel, aluminum? Minnick advises to think in terms of the long haul. Maybe you’re buying a welder now to restore an old car, but in the future you may want to do other kinds of welding–such as repair the running gear for your snow plow. Sure, you have to buy equipment to meet your present need, but include some forward thinking in your choice.



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