From Anthropology to Arc Welding

Aleasha Hladilek, Welder

Aleasha Hladilek was working in a shop making futons, and discovered she liked building things and working with her hands.  So, with her Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology, student loans, and dreams of owning a house, she decided to add to her skills and signed up for the welding program at a technical college.  She’s been working as a welder for the last 11 years.

“My welding skills have kept me well employed and proud of my work,” she says.

What welding process(es) do you use the most or feel more familiar with?

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Shielded Metal Arc Welding, Aluminum wire feed.  I teach a full time welding program, so I use and am proficient in Gas Metal Arc Welding, Flux Cored Arc Welding, and Metal Cored Arc Welding, but they are not my favorite processes.

How did you train?

I teach a full time welding program at Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College.  One of the best things about teaching is that I am constantly learning as well.  I have my summers off and take other welding jobs to keep up my practice and also because I enjoy them.

What kind of welding jobs have you held?

Continue reading

Moving Hot Steel

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Jaclyn Davidson at work

Jaclyn Davidson is not a welder, but she does work with metal and solders some amazing jewelry.  She started out working with gold, but for the last ten years she has been working with weathered carbon steel, turning it into jewelry that is showcased in the Smithsonian and the Museum of Art and Design (MAD). Her work has received “best of show” in venues along the east coast, including the Philadelphia Craft Show in 2005. My work received the Verdura prize in 2007. She is represented by Charon Kranson at SOFA.

“My work uses the most rusted beautiful carbon steel there is in the junk yard and it is worn to places of high esteem,” Jaclyn says.

Jaclyn says her attraction to metals began when she was in university.  “The steel thing happened many years after I was selling gold jewelry,” she says, when she had the opportunity to be involved in a steel fabricating shop. “The ease of moving hot steel and the many facets of its personality were so different from pervious metals.”  And she fell in love:  “Big huge in the falling in love with carbon steel was its perceived non importance….one could work with it and not in any way worry about the cost. This was really important for me.” Continue reading

What’s Hot for February?

11008264_543267525813172_1721225127_nDid you know you can follow Arc-Zone.com on Instagram?  Over on JoeWelder.com we just posted a round-up of some of our most popular posts.  But if you follow us on Instagram, you’ll not only get some amazing photos of inside our shop, from Jim out in the field, news from our PRO Partners and from our customers, you’ll get first notice of special promotions…. and if you strut your welding stuff on Instagram, we may just feature YOUR work!  Tag #arczone and #weldlikeagirl and we just find you!

 

Before February passes, we want to let you know about some promotions that you’ll find on our Best Sellers and Favorites section of our webstore:

Pictured here is the CK-230 water cooled 300 amp TIG torch from CK Worldwide.  This month we’re offering 10% off PRO Torch package.  You can choose from the CK-230 Flex Head or the Rigid Head TIG torch and the 12.5′ or the 25′ cables.

If you already have a basic TIG torch, you can UPGRADE what you’ve got by purchasing a Upgrade Kit.  Select the PRO Upgrade kit for your CK Series 2 /  Weldcraft/Miller 9/20 style TIG torchPRO Upgrade kit for your TIG Torch OR a PRO Upgrade kit for your CK Series 3 / Weldcraft 17/18/26 style TIG torch.

Complete TIG Torch Kit Contains:

  • Ballistic nylon cable cover
  • Choice of 1/16″ (1.6mm) or 3/32″ (2.4mm) Gas Saver™ Series front end parts with #8 (1/2″ (12.7mm)) pyrex nozzle
  • One ArcTime™ non-radioactive hybrid tungsten electrode precision ground to 22° (installed)
  • Spare #7 alumina nozzle
  • TIG Calculator
  • Shield gas flow tester

These are 17/18/26 (3 Series) front end parts compatible with most manufacturer’s 17, 18, and 26 style TIG torches. Including but not limet to:
CK-150, CK-C150, CK-210, CK-300, CK-510, CK-TL210, CK-TL300, CK-TL18, CK-TL26, CK-FL150, CK-FL250, CK-17, CK-18, CK-26, WP-18, WP-17, WP-26, CS410.

 

Grandmother’s Stories Inspired This New Rosie

Miranda: Woman TIG WeldingMiranda Duckworth grew up hearing stories of her great grandmother Winnie Mae Long, an original Rosie working as a boilermaker at the Tampa Shipyard during World War II.

After the war her great grandmother welded side-by-side with her husband in their own welding shop.

“Her stories inspired me to follow in her footsteps,” Miranda says.

Recently Miranda was offered a boilermaker apprenticeship position in Tampa, Florida and she is currently practicing for the required welding test.

What excites you about welding?

That is a science and art combined which are my two passions in life. I have lots of practice in stick welding but have more of a knack for aluminum TIG. Continue reading

From Sonic to Combo Welder

noid-2014-05-03_17.31.57-2Adora Ramirez has been welding for about ten years.

Her stepfather introduced her to welding, and started her off with a garage MIG gun. “It couldn’t weld very thick metal– it was just a home welder,” she says.

How long have you been welding, and what got you interested in welding?

I’ve been welding for about ten years now. I got into welding after my stepfather was in a motorcycle accident and died. He was a welder and he taught me a few tricks with the MIG gun. Well after his death I was working at Sonic and saw a 45-year-old women working as a bar hop. Things just came into perspective and I told myself that would not be me. So I quit my job that day and enrolled in college in the welding program. I picked up welding to honor my stepfather John…. kinda my way of keeping him close to my heart. Continue reading