Category Archives: Welding Education

Welding training, education, and certification information. Not how-tos or welding tips, but information about schools and certifications for welders.

Back to Welding (Safety) School

It seems every time I look at at headline that has “welding” in the title it’s about a welding school expanding their offerings–the predicted shortage of welders is here.

There are a lot of welding school options, from your local community college where the courses may be more affordable, to the more specialized training schools like Wyotech, Lincoln Electric’s Welding School, or Tulsa Welding School where you can learn pipe welding, automotive technology, shipfitting and sheet metal fabrication.  (Check out the American Welding Society’s Welding School Locator to find a program near you.)

Once you’ve made the decision to go to school you’ll need to have some of your own gear.  Most welding schools will most likely give you list of welding supplies, starting with welding safety.  

Start with Welding Safety

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Congratulations Oregon Tradeswomen!

One of the more active groups in promoting women in the trades and encouraging women to join the trades is Oregon Tradeswomen, Inc. (OTI), an organization founded on the principles that women deserve and can attain economic self-sufficiency through pursuing careers in the building, mechanical, electrical, and utility trades while helping and encouraging the trades industry build up a diverse workforce.

THE HARDWORKING, GRANT WINNING STAFF FROM OTI

FROM OTI:

Oregon Tradeswomen, Inc. (OTI) is proud to announce that on June 14, 2016, we were awarded a Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional Occupations (WANTO) grant to continue our work connecting women with high wage, high skill trades careers through registered apprenticeship.

“Oregon Tradeswomen, Inc. is honored to work with our partners, Seattle-based Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Employment for Women and Oakland, California-based Tradeswomen Inc. through the Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional Occupations program,’’ said Connie Ashbrook, OTI’s Executive Director.  “Many women in our communities are passionately interested in working in the construction, manufacturing and utility trades, but don’t know where to get started.  Our joint efforts to provide women with the education, skills, and connections they need support their access to and success in family-supporting trades careers, while at the same time helping apprenticeship programs and employers diversify their workforces.”

The $650,000 will be awarded over the course of two years. It will fund direct technical assistance work in the Portland, Seattle, and Oakland metropolitan regions, as well as outreach throughout the Western United States.

READ MORE AT THE OTI WEBSITE–>

THIS is great news for women and the for the industry!  We look forward to more good news from the Oregon Tradeswomen.

 

Welding Scrap Into Art: Arc-Zone PRO Partner Joanie Butler

Joanie Butler welding scrap metal into art at Arc-Zone.com

That’s Joanie under that mask!

You may know Arc-Zone’s Joanie Butler from the phone– she may have helped you put your welding supplies order together as part of our team, or she may have answered a technical welding question for you over email.  When Joanie is not serving as Arc-Zone’s Pro Account Manager, she is working on her metal art.  Joanie is known for taking scrap metal and turning it into amazing art.  She has a fondness for critters, from dogs and owls to starfish and spiders.  Check out her work on Instagram, you’ll be amazed.

One of Joanie’s recent projects was welding up this little bull dog for Aaron Biefer, owner/operator of Bulldog Welding in Holly, Michigan (check out his work,  @BulldogWelding on Instagram).

bull dog welded from scrap

When Aaron challenged Joanie to recreate his four legged BFF #bulldog Owen back in January, she was so happy to honor a pet that was still alive. “I had absolutely no idea my own dog would be diagnosed with an incurable cancer just a little over a month into the build,” she says. Continue reading

How do we Expose more Women to Welding?

According to NBC news, only 3% of professional welders in the U.S. are women. What’s the reason for the shortage of women welders? According to professional welder Caitlin Rude: “I don’t think that there’s a big difference between men’s and women’s work. I think that there’s a big difference between those who are dedicated and passionate about welding and those who aren’t.” 

In this video, Kalei Kipp, a female high school welding student from Pennsylvania meets with Caitlin Rude to discuss what it’s like to be a female welder.

What are your thoughts on the shortage of women welders? Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below.

From Car Problem to Welder

Pamela Richardson: Woman Welder

Pamela Richardson: Woman Welder / Professor

Over twenty years ago Pamela Richardson was having car problems and the family mechanic, Uncle Walter, was busy. When Pamela’s car broke down (again) across the street from a Mom and Pop garage, she must of thought it was fate… the guy checked under the hood and said he could fix the car by the next day—for $450. She was so proud of herself for taking care of her own business until her uncle told her she’d been ripped off. The mechanic had installed $20 thermostat, a repair that with her uncle’s help she could have done herself.

Uncle Walter told Pamela she better learn how to do things like this for herself or she would continue to get taken advantage of… advice that resonates with any Do-It-Yourselfer!

“That very week I went to the nearest skill center,” she said.  Pamela enrolled in an automotive repair program where she learned that in order to be a master mechanic she’d have to know how to weld as well. A quick tour of the welding department and she was ready to sign up.
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Why Military Women Should Consider a Career In Welding

A career in welding may be a great option for a military woman, whether she is still in active service or back in civilian life. Welding often pays well, offers parc-zone military women weldinglenty of room for advancement, and obliterates the glass ceiling that many women face in the workplace. Women have worked in shipyards and factories since WWII, when many men had to leave their welding jobs to serve overseas, opening up an area of work previously closed off to women. Yet, even today, despite the huge advances women have made in all arenas, their numbers are still largely underrepresented in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

 

Welding Jobs for Military Women

There are more than 500,000 welders in the United States, according to the American Welding Society. When most people think of welders, they usually picture a burly man behind the mask. Less than five percent of welders in the world are females, as we stated before on this blog.** But think about this: Military women may be uniquely qualified to consider a career in welding. Military females have the discipline, training, and experience necessary to excel in the workplace as welders. Continue reading