Category Archives: Welding Magazines

20 Years of Flames, Sparks and Melting Metal!

AWS Member Card

I got my AWS membership credential in the mail recently– I have been a member for 20 years! If you are not familiar with the American Welding Society. The AWS is the welding professional, standards, and certification organization. I would encourage you to get involved, check out there web site and if you want to know more drop me a line and I would be happy to help you get set up with the benefits of an AWS membership.

Check out the signature from the AWS President–Nancy Cole!  First woman president of AWS!  We’re interviewing her now for an upcoming feature on CarmenElectrode.com where we regularly profile women welders–the New Rosies.

AWS is leading the way in advancing the technology of welding, making membership a great way to stay up-to-date with the latest and greatest (some of which you’ll find over at Arc-Zone.com) with the Welding Journal magazine, tons of Technical Publications, Welding Educational Programs, and Welding Certification programs, it’s also a great place to mix and mingle with your colleagues in the industry.

Each year the AWS holds a trade show, FABTECH International and the AWS Welding Show, and on the local level you can join your AWS chapter.

And, if you need to up your skill level– or you (or someone you know) is interested in getting into the welding industry, the online Welding School Locator will get you started. AWS also offers scholarships, and welding student chapters.

 

UPDATE:  just learned that Nancy Cole is the 2nd woman president of AWS!  either way, it’s big news and nice to see!

Standing the Heat

An introduction to friction stir welding
By Jeff Defalco, Contributing Writer
September 15, 2009
A relatively new joining process, friction stir welding (FSW) produces no fumes; uses no filler material; and can join aluminum alloys, copper, magnesium, zinc, steels, and titanium. FSW sometimes produces a weld that is stronger than the base material.
Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. Because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material, a high-quality weld is created. This characteristic greatly reduces the ill effects of high heat input, including distortion, and eliminates solidification defects. Friction stir welding also is highly efficient, produces no fumes, and uses no filler material, which make this process environmentally friendly.
History
Friction stir welding was invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in December 1991. TWI filed successfully for patents in Europe, the U.S., Japan, and Australia. TWI then established TWI Group-Sponsored Project 5651,”Development of the New Friction Stir Technique for Welding Aluminum,” in 1992 to further study this technique.
The development project was conducted in three phases. Phase I proved FSW to be a realistic and practical welding technique, while at the same time addressing the welding of 6000 series aluminum alloys. Phase II successfully examined the welding of aerospace and ship aluminum alloys, 2000 and 5000 series, respectively. Process parameter tolerances, metallurgical characteristics, and mechanical properties for these materials were established. Phase III developed pertinent data for further industrialization of FSW.
Since its invention, the process has received world-wide attention, and today FSW is used in research and production in many sectors, including aerospace, automotive, railway, shipbuilding, electronic housings, coolers, heat exchangers, and nuclear waste containers.

“If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.”

This expression makes absolutely no sense if you’re in the profession of welding.

#1:  If you can’t stand the heat, why the heck are you a welder?

#2:  There is no kitchen.  What kitchen?  If you’re welding in a kitchen, get out of that kitchen. Right now! There are gas mains!

#3:  If you can stand the heat, and you’re not in a kitchen, then why would you move?  Stand right there!

In fact, let’s add some more heat.  Let’s add some… friction.

That’s right, you heard me. Friction, as in friction stir welding. FSW. It’s all the rage in… in…

Just read.

An introduction to friction stir welding

By Jeff Defalco, Contributing Writer
September 15, 2009

A relatively new joining process, friction stir welding (FSW) produces no fumes; uses no filler material; and can join aluminum alloys, copper, magnesium, zinc, steels, and titanium. FSW sometimes produces a weld that is stronger than the base material.

fsw-cylindrical-shouldered-tool-profiled-probeFriction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. Because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material, a high-quality weld is created. This characteristic greatly reduces the ill effects of high heat input, including distortion, and eliminates solidification defects.

Friction stir welding also is highly efficient, produces no fumes, and uses no filler material, which make this process environmentally friendly.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE ->

Robots on the Job

ABB’s VirtualArc robot welding simulation software teaches robots without waste
19 August 2009
ABB says its VirtualArc robot welding simulation software allows welding robots to achieve precise, clean, mass-produced welds.
Human welders draw on experience, intuition and trial-and-error to establish the right parameters for a welding job. Transferring this skill to robots can be complex.
While robots speed productivity, and provide accurate repeatability of tasks, they can only get the welding right if they have been programmed correctly.
Got a Question about this product?
Enquire NowVisit Website
“Teaching” a robot to perform a arc-weld, means providing it with the knowledge that comes from many years of human experience and the intuition that enables it to choose the appropriate process for a new task.
Traditionally, experienced welder set up the welding parameters on robots by performing a series of test welds and adjusting parameters to hone the result. This approach uses up materials, manpower and energy.
ABB says its VirtualArc software features on-screen optimization of welding parameters, avoiding real-life trial and error, saving welding materials and energy. It can define the exact parameters then test them virtually, without actually carrying out any welds.
The software uses a sophisticated simulator that incorporates information on the equipment available, such as the welding device and the power supply, and application data, such as the materials to be used, the plate thickness, and the required joint configuration.
Depending on the results of the virtual test, the operator can adjust parameters such as weld speed, torch angle etc. and optimize for maximum productivity and minimum energy use, while maintaining the required quality of the weld and allowing the plant’s robots to continue with their work on other applications.

ROBOTS ARE TAKING OVER THE WORLD!!!

Ok, not the whole world – just the job parts…

ABB’s VirtualArc robot welding simulation software teaches robots without waste

19 August 2009

ABB says its VirtualArc robot welding simulation software allows welding robots to achieve precise, clean, mass-produced welds.

robotsHuman welders draw on experience, intuition and trial-and-error to establish the right parameters for a welding job. Transferring this skill to robots can be complex.

While robots speed productivity, and provide accurate repeatability of tasks, they can only get the welding right if they have been programmed correctly.

“Teaching” a robot to perform a arc-weld, means providing it with the knowledge that comes from many years of human experience and the intuition that enables it to choose the appropriate process for a new task.

Traditionally, experienced welder set up the welding parameters on robots by performing a series of test welds and adjusting parameters to hone the result. This approach uses up materials, manpower and energy.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE ->

So, what do you think?  Yay or nay to robots on the job?

Connect with Miller and Win!

Want some free Miller welding equipment???

This month, Miller Electric is giving away over $2,000 worth of welding supplies to one lucky grand prize winner!

To enter for a chance to win, just sign up for one of Miller’s eNewsletters to keep in touch with industry news and the latest how-to advice!

Complete Grand Prize Package:

GTAW Improvements

There is a new welding process, recently developed in Europe, that is said to not only improve welds but also lower the skill required to make them.  It uses a “manual and automated GTAW wire feed control combined with a hot-wire power source” that improves the wire feed, weld pool, and weld deposition and decreases gas consumption.

Enhancing the GTAW process

By Ed Craig, Contributing Writer
September 15, 2009

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG), a popular process for high-quality manual welding, has its limitations and requires highly skilled operators. A process used in Europe addresses those limitations, enhances productivity and weld quality, and reduces the skill level required to GTAW.

gtaw-welder-figure-3For at least six decades, traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) has been considered the process of choice for attaining high-quality welds in any metal application. However, this process has certain drawbacks, such as the weld energy limitation influenced by the weld pool dynamics and typically slow manual wire feed rates. Manual GTAW requires highly skilled operators who possess the dexterity necessary to feed the wire. Manual GTAW techniques vary, and the weld-wire-to-arc and weld puddle placement are inconsistent.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE ->

Plasma Cutting for Beginners

If you already know all about plasma cutting, then this article is not for you, but if you’re new to the industry, or investigating all the metal fabrication processes out there, then check it out.

Plasma cutting and how it works

By Kent Swart, Contributing Writer
August 11, 2009

What is plasma cutting, and when is it your best metal cutting option? What information do you need to choose the right plasma system? This article answers these questions and more about plasma cutting.

plasma-cuttingThe basic technology for plasma cutting has been around for decades. Researchers and engineers remain focused on increasing cut speed, improving cut quality, and extending consumable life, while making systems smaller and more powerful.

What Is Plasma Cutting?

Once a gas is heated to an extremely high temperature and ionized, it becomes electrically conductive and is considered to be plasma. Plasma arc cutting and gouging processes use plasma to transfer an electrical arc to the workpiece. The metal to be cut or removed is melted by the arc’s heat and then blown away.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE ->

And check out this article about plasma arc cutting over at Arc-Zone.com… tips to maximize the life of your PAC consumables and enhance your cut quality –>

Hypertherm PAC torches at Arc-Zone.com …and check out the line of Plasma Arc Cutting Torches and replacement parts at Arc-Zone.com.