Category Archives: Welding History

Thankful for: Weldcraft and the Crafter Series TIG Torch

I started with Weldcraft when it was a small manufacturing company in Burbank, Calif. making welding accessories. When the company was sold in 1985, I had the opportunity to work my way up to Director of Manufacturing and I even became a top performing sales manager. I was able to travel  around the world representing a quality manufacturer in an industry I enjoyed. I met with international distributors, system integrators, and end users and began to really understand what our customers needed.

CS-300 Crafter Series Air-Cooled TIG Torch

CS-300 Crafter Series Air-Cooled TIG Torch

It was out of this experience that I developed the Crafter Series TIG Torch and earned a patent for both the design and the improvements to functionality.

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TIG Welding in the U.S.A.

TIG TorchFor the month of July our theme is U.S.A. All the Way!  So we’re starting with a little history lesson– on TIG Welding and some of the innovations in the welding industry developed here.

The GTAW (TIG) welding process was first developed in Southern California in the early 1940’s by Russell Meredith of Northrop Aircraft Corporation. At that time Northrop needed a way to weld aluminum and magnesium and current welding processes were not adequate to weld these alloys.  President Roosevelt, in a letter to Winston Churchill, would later boast about the discovery of new welding techniques that enabled America to build ships with a speed unequaled in the history of shipbuilding.

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Joe Welder, American Chopper, and the evolution of the TIG torch

I was watching American Chopper with my wife last night and when they did a close up of Rick Petko TIG welding a custom gas tank together, my wife said, “He is using a Crafter Series TIG torch!”

That brought back memories of 1994 when we were dating and I was the Regional Sales Manager for Weldcraft, the world’s leading TIG torch manufacturer.  I was living in the western suburbs of Chicago, Saint Charles, IL to be exact.  I had a nice 1,000 Sq Ft fab shop behind my ranch house.

That shop is where I tinkered with an idea to solve a major problem with the TIG torches on the market at that time.  There was not a torch on the market that was ready to go right out of the box, with nozzle, tungsten, connectors and all.  I also added a flat side on the handle so that the welder can know which direction the torch is facing without lifting his helmet.  I built the first prototypes of what became the Crafter Series TIG torch, complete with the silicone rubber test molds, handle mock ups, etc.

I was working with long time racing buddy and good friend, John Dimock, the Southwest Sales Manager for Weldcraft.  We were getting ready for that AWS (American Welding Society) trade show in Chicago. Our sister company at the time was Bernard Welding Equipment located in the South suburbs, so it was important and all the Executives would be at the show.  Based on my travels to distributors all over the world, it became clear that there was a need for a high-performance TIG torch that was easy to sell and more than a copy of a 30-year-old design.  Besides the prototype sample torches, we put together a complete marketing proposal and sales plan.  We assembled all of the executives in one room and laid out the prototype and marketing plan to them.  I was surprised when the response was, “How much do you need and when can we get it done?”

That was the beginning of the Crafter Series line – the next generation of high-performance water-cooled TIG torches, and one of the best-selling premium TIG torches of all time.  Since that time, the concept has been copied by WeldTec and branded as a “Speedway” series, and of course there is no shortage of “import” TIG torches that are branded with a variety of names on them, but all share the same reverse-engineered components from a generation ago.

Times change and that leads me to today.  Arc-Zone welcomed Josh Sprinkle, the Weldcraft regional Sales Manager.  He stopped by the Zone today to share with us the next step forward in TIG torch design and performance from Weldcraft.

The WP-280 is a re-engineered version of the world’s most popular TIG torch model.  This torch rocks, it has an integral Super Cool™ water chamber built into the head, an improved cable and hose design with ColorSmart™ identification, and the hoses easily connect to the TIG torch body with screw-on hose nipples.  No more stainless steel wire ties!  Lastly, the new WP-280 series has a compact and friendly handle with just the right feel to it, and for those of us who value a small, comfortable and powerful TIG torch, the new Weldcraft WP-280 fits the bill.  I have one on my machine and I love it!

This is what the Crafter Series concept was all about, a TIG torch that was created in the engineering department by electrical and mechanical engineers, tested in the lab, and field tested by some of the top fabricators in the metal working industry.  Stay tuned, in a few days I’ll post an interview we did with Josh from Weldcraft that gives the scoop on this cool new torch.  Meanwhile, check it out for yourself right here in our store.

Here’s a spec sheet of the WP-280 from Weldcraft.

Ever wonder about the History of Your Welder?

Interesting behind the scenes look at Miller Electric, including some great old photos

And did you know Lincoln Electric was founded in 1895?

And did you know that whatever your machine… you can Weld Like A Pro(TM) with welding accessories, from TIG Torches to MIG torches and from welding apparel to welding positioners… from Arc-Zone.com, of course!

TIG Welding a bit of history

Finally catching up on my newsletter reading and came across this awesome article from Lincoln…

Two years ago, Ridler Award winner (and from the looks of this car, a master fabricator) Dan Webb set out to honor this iconic creation by building a low-sloping hotrod variation of the original, the iconic 1917 Golden Submarine Racecar.

The project, powered by Lincoln, is showcased over on the Lincoln website… check it out–>

And if you’re looking to create the kind of TIG welds Webb did, check out Arc-Zone.com’s line up of  TIG Torches. We feature  CK Worldwide and Weldcraft, two fine manufacturers of TIG Torches and replacement parts.

And, did you know Arc-Zone.com  now has CK TIG Torch replacement parts online?  You’ll find the replacement parts listed along side the torches we offer.

Standing the Heat

An introduction to friction stir welding
By Jeff Defalco, Contributing Writer
September 15, 2009
A relatively new joining process, friction stir welding (FSW) produces no fumes; uses no filler material; and can join aluminum alloys, copper, magnesium, zinc, steels, and titanium. FSW sometimes produces a weld that is stronger than the base material.
Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. Because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material, a high-quality weld is created. This characteristic greatly reduces the ill effects of high heat input, including distortion, and eliminates solidification defects. Friction stir welding also is highly efficient, produces no fumes, and uses no filler material, which make this process environmentally friendly.
History
Friction stir welding was invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in December 1991. TWI filed successfully for patents in Europe, the U.S., Japan, and Australia. TWI then established TWI Group-Sponsored Project 5651,”Development of the New Friction Stir Technique for Welding Aluminum,” in 1992 to further study this technique.
The development project was conducted in three phases. Phase I proved FSW to be a realistic and practical welding technique, while at the same time addressing the welding of 6000 series aluminum alloys. Phase II successfully examined the welding of aerospace and ship aluminum alloys, 2000 and 5000 series, respectively. Process parameter tolerances, metallurgical characteristics, and mechanical properties for these materials were established. Phase III developed pertinent data for further industrialization of FSW.
Since its invention, the process has received world-wide attention, and today FSW is used in research and production in many sectors, including aerospace, automotive, railway, shipbuilding, electronic housings, coolers, heat exchangers, and nuclear waste containers.

“If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.”

This expression makes absolutely no sense if you’re in the profession of welding.

#1:  If you can’t stand the heat, why the heck are you a welder?

#2:  There is no kitchen.  What kitchen?  If you’re welding in a kitchen, get out of that kitchen. Right now! There are gas mains!

#3:  If you can stand the heat, and you’re not in a kitchen, then why would you move?  Stand right there!

In fact, let’s add some more heat.  Let’s add some… friction.

That’s right, you heard me. Friction, as in friction stir welding. FSW. It’s all the rage in… in…

Just read.

An introduction to friction stir welding

By Jeff Defalco, Contributing Writer
September 15, 2009

A relatively new joining process, friction stir welding (FSW) produces no fumes; uses no filler material; and can join aluminum alloys, copper, magnesium, zinc, steels, and titanium. FSW sometimes produces a weld that is stronger than the base material.

fsw-cylindrical-shouldered-tool-profiled-probeFriction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. Because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material, a high-quality weld is created. This characteristic greatly reduces the ill effects of high heat input, including distortion, and eliminates solidification defects.

Friction stir welding also is highly efficient, produces no fumes, and uses no filler material, which make this process environmentally friendly.

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